Cramped.

This past semester, that I am finally free from, I took a human presence drawing class (figure drawing, basically). For something that we all see everyday (the human), it’s rather difficult to draw our own kind. I mean, I can whip you out a drawing of a cat or dog in a second, but humans? Hold on while I go find my stacks of ref pictures.

Actually, the structure of the class was, while painful, one of the best ways to approach understanding human anatomy: technically/scientifically. Meaning, our number one priority was to learn a majority of the bones and muscles names, locations, and how they interacted with one another. Granted, our professor used to work as a surgeon before he became an artist, so it’s not too surprising.

Needless to say, I felt like I was in an A&P class where, along with memorizing the part of the body, we had to draw them as well.

I was disappointed in most of my work from this class. While not bad, it was all just practice to me. There was not really much that I would consider “finished” work (not to mention most of my figures still carried my bad habits of manga figures: loooooong legs).

But this one turned out rather well.

Created with charcoal and my eraser.

Truthfully, it’s not the most accurate anatomy wise, but it was a good test for me, since it was a drawing we had to create that the models couldn’t pose for us (dubbed “the impossible drawing” by my professor). We basically had to take bits and pieces from the models; like how a knee looks bent or how an ankle looks, and put it all together to create a whole figure.

I chose a subject matter that I thought would be challenging for me, and it was. But I’m happy how it turned out, especially since the “squished” feeling I was hoping for shines through. Every time other students in my class walked by this work, they usually commented “I wouldn’t want to be in that position.”

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Art and illustration, General sort of posting

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s